Continental imitation sterling penny, Fressingfield

A Continental imitation sterling penny of Gaucher of Chatillon was found by a local metal detector user near Fressingfield earlier this year. The obverse of the coin features a crowned bust and the legend reads GALChs COMES [P]Orc, which means Gaucher, Count of Porcien. The reverse of the coin features a long cross dividing theContinue reading “Continental imitation sterling penny, Fressingfield”

A multi-period site at Johnson’s Farm, Leiston

Featured Image: View north-west of the medieval farmstead complex © Pre-Construct Archaeology A multi-period site, with remains dating from the prehistoric to the post-medieval periods, has been excavated on the edge of Leiston ahead of a housing development. Although a number of Neolithic flints were found at the site, the earliest recorded archaeology was aContinue reading “A multi-period site at Johnson’s Farm, Leiston”

Miniature Socketed Axe, Sutton

A Late Iron Age to Roman miniature socketed axe found near Sutton. In this month’s Featured Find, we take you back to 2009 when this almost complete miniature socketed axe was recovered by a metal detector user. The axe is triangular in profile and has a socketed mouth with a single transverse mouth moulding. ItContinue reading “Miniature Socketed Axe, Sutton”

Roman silver denarius of Augustus, Ashfield cum Thorpe

A silver Roman coin found near Ashfield cum Thorpe. Recovered by a metal-detector user in 2020, this Roman coin is an issue of the first emperor Augustus, who reigned between 27 BC – AD 13. The front of the coin, called the ‘obverse’, features the bust of Augustus in profile. Augustus’ head is laureate, meaningContinue reading “Roman silver denarius of Augustus, Ashfield cum Thorpe”

Three Roman rabbit or hare brooches

This week we bring you three Roman brooches in the style of rabbits (or hares) recovered in Suffolk by local metal detector users. All three are known as ‘plate brooches’ because they are characterised by a flat plate, the front face of which is usually decorated with enamel inlay. These seem more decorative and lessContinue reading “Three Roman rabbit or hare brooches”

Romans Found in Monks Eleigh

Featured Image: The stripped excavation area showing the excavated enclosure ditch, © Border Archaeology A rural settlement, dating back approximately 2000 years to the Late Iron Age/Roman period, has been excavated in the village of Monks Eleigh. The excavations, which took place in September 2020 by Border Archaeology, revealed evidence of an early field systemContinue reading “Romans Found in Monks Eleigh”

Roman brooch, Lackford

A copper-alloy Roman zoomorphic plate brooch, found near Lackford. This zoomorphic brooch was recovered by a local metal detector user earlier this year. The term ‘zoomorphic’ is used to signify animal representation. In this case, it is something of a misnomer because the creature is mythological. It is the ‘hippocamp’, coming from the Greek wordsContinue reading “Roman brooch, Lackford”

The Hoxne Hoard

Featured Image: Gold and Silver coins from the Hoxne Hoard, © British Museum The Hoxne Hoard is one of the largest Roman treasure hoards ever to have been discovered in Britain. It consists of almost 15,000 coins and 200 other gold and silver objects buried in the 5th century AD. The Hoard was discovered byContinue reading “The Hoxne Hoard”

Top 10 Finds from Suffolk

1.5 million archaeological objects have been unearthed by the public and recorded through the national Portable Antiquities Scheme (PAS) – a staggering 81,750 of these were from Suffolk! To celebrate this monumental milestone, Anna and Riccardo from our Finds Recording Team have picked out their Top 10 favourite finds from Suffolk to share with you.Continue reading “Top 10 Finds from Suffolk”

Conserving Roman Armour

The Archaeological Service worked with University College London to conserve this rare Roman armour, which was found by a local metal detectorist in 2019. This unusual copper-alloy Roman armour was found by metal detecting in south-east Suffolk – the finder left the object in-situ and called the Archaeological Service’s Finds Recording Team to help excavateContinue reading “Conserving Roman Armour”