Discovering the lost stones of Bury St Edmunds

Featured image: Head of a king in the herb garden © Ron Baxter Built in the 11th century, the Abbey at Bury St Edmunds was one of the most influential in medieval Europe until its suppression in 1539. The extensive remains still survive today. Since 2005, the Abbey’s stonework has been a focus of researchContinue reading “Discovering the lost stones of Bury St Edmunds”

Early Medieval lozengiform strip brooch, Ousden

This Early Medieval strip brooch was found by a local metal detector user near Ousden in 2020. Strip brooches are so named because they were made from a single piece of copper-alloy, a ‘strip’. They would have been worn as dress accessories. This brooch is almost complete, missing only the spring and pin. It consistsContinue reading “Early Medieval lozengiform strip brooch, Ousden”

A multi-period site at Johnson’s Farm, Leiston

Featured Image: View north-west of the medieval farmstead complex © Pre-Construct Archaeology A multi-period site, with remains dating from the prehistoric to the post-medieval periods, has been excavated on the edge of Leiston ahead of a housing development. Although a number of Neolithic flints were found at the site, the earliest recorded archaeology was aContinue reading “A multi-period site at Johnson’s Farm, Leiston”

Our Favourite Archaeology in Suffolk – Bellcage at East Bergholt

Featured Image: Bellcage located in the Churchyard. Source: Copyright Historic England We continue with our blog series showcasing some of our favourite archaeology in Suffolk. This week, we visit a unique bellcage in East Bergholt with Abby. Abby is a Senior Archaeological Officer and has been with the team since 2008. She is currently onContinue reading “Our Favourite Archaeology in Suffolk – Bellcage at East Bergholt”

Our Favourite Archaeology in Suffolk – Gardens and parkland at Ickworth House

Featured Image: Ickworth gardens and parkland. Source: National Trust We continue with our blog series showcasing some of our favourite archaeology in Suffolk. This week, we explore the beautiful Ickworth gardens, parkland and house with Grace. Grace is the Archaeological Officer (HER) and has been a part of the SCCAS team since 2016. Day toContinue reading “Our Favourite Archaeology in Suffolk – Gardens and parkland at Ickworth House”

Our Favourite Archaeology in Suffolk – Dunwich

Featured Image: Aerial View of Dunwich. Source: Dunwich Museum We continue with our blog series showcasing some of our favourite archaeology in Suffolk. Each week you’ll meet a member of the team who will share with you their favourite archaeological site to visit or favourite find. This week, we explore the lost town of DunwichContinue reading “Our Favourite Archaeology in Suffolk – Dunwich”

Remains of medieval bridge, Eye Castle

Rare remains of 800-year-old bridge found near Eye Castle in Suffolk. The remains of a previously unknown medieval wooden bridge have been discovered at Eye, in the north of Suffolk. Experts believe the oak remains were part of the defences of Eye Castle, dating back as far as 1200 AD. The wood was in suchContinue reading “Remains of medieval bridge, Eye Castle”

Our Favourite Archaeology in Suffolk – Abbey ruins in Bury St Edmunds

Greg is an Assistant Historic Environment Record Officer and has been part of the team for the past 6 years. Day-to-day they carry out HER searches and take part in project work. My favourite site is the ruins of the Abbey in Bury St Edmunds. It represents a tangible connection to the history of theContinue reading “Our Favourite Archaeology in Suffolk – Abbey ruins in Bury St Edmunds”

Early Medieval (Anglo-Scandinavian) strap end, Great Barton

An Early Medieval strap end, found near Great Barton was recovered by a metal detector user back in 2011. This Early Medieval strap end dates to circa AD 800-900. The object is complete and consists of a broadly oval plate which tapers into what is known as a ‘zoomorphic’ terminal because it is stylised inContinue reading “Early Medieval (Anglo-Scandinavian) strap end, Great Barton”

New publication on the animal bone from Ipswich

A new publication, Provisioning Ipswich: Animal remains from the Saxon and medieval town, by Pam Crabtree, has just been published by East Anglian Archaeology. Ipswich began as a small town in the 7th century and soon expanded from the 8th century into an important urban centre and international port, with craft production and international trade.Continue reading “New publication on the animal bone from Ipswich”